Have you heard about the NIH Research Supplements for Diversity in Health-Related Research?

From the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, click here to read “Finding the Sweet Spot for your Diversity Supplement Application” to learn more.

Research Funding Opportunity from NIH

(Announcement prepared by the Grants Facilitation Unit UC Davis School of Medicine)

Research Supplements to Promote Diversity in Health-Related Research (Admin Supp. – Clinical Trial Not Allowed) PA-18-906 (Opportunity ends September 8th, 2021).

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-18-906.html#_Section_V._Application

This PA provides an opportunity for funded investigators to support diversity candidates with a supplement to a currently funded grant. Most NIH Institutes and Centers are participating and most grant mechanisms are eligible. It is recommended that the applicant read the FOA carefully prior to contacting the program officer for the funded parent grant to receive appropriate instruction for submission of the supplement and to see if the parent grant is eligible. An e-mail heads up might be useful before a phone call. (Sometimes there are specific contacts for minority supplement that you might be directed to).

Given that the supplements are not peer reviewed but NIH Institute reviewed (and each Institute can be a little different), be sure to ask the program officer:
1) When are the applications due? (Some are accepted on a monthly basis).
2) If there are any page limitation directions separate from that of the parent grant limitations.
3) If there are any limitations due to the funding and ending date of the parent grant.
4) What the budget limitations might be.
5) How the applications are reviewed.

General eligibility is described below:

A) Individuals from racial and ethnic groups that have been shown by the NSF to be underrepresented in health-related sciences on a national basis. (See link below for more information) http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/showpub.cfm?TopID=2&SubID=27) and the report Women, Minorities, and Persons with Disabilities in Science and Engineering). The following racial and ethnic groups have been shown to be underrepresented in biomedical research: Blacks or African Americans, Hispanics or Latinos, American Indians or Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders.  In addition, it is recognized that underrepresentation can vary from setting to setting; individuals from racial or ethnic groups that can be demonstrated convincingly to be underrepresented by the grantee institution should be encouraged to participate in this program.  For more information on racial and ethnic categories and definitions, see NOT-OD-15-089.

B) Individuals with disabilities, who are defined as those with a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, as described in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended. See NSF data at http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/wmpd/2013/pdf/tab7-5_updated_2014_10.pdf.

C) Individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds, defined as:

  • Individuals who come from a family with an annual income below established low-income thresholds. These thresholds are based on family size, published by the U.S. Bureau of the Census; adjusted annually for changes in the Consumer Price Index; and adjusted by the Secretary for use in all health professions programs. The Secretary periodically publishes these income levels at http://aspe.hhs.gov/poverty/index.shtml.
  •  Individuals who come from an educational environment such as that found in certain rural or inner-city environments that has demonstrably and directly inhibited the individual from obtaining the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to develop and participate in a research career.AThe disadvantaged background category (C1 and C2) refers to the financial and educational background of individuals, particularly before graduating from high school, while residing in the United States. It should be noted that literature also shows that women from the above backgrounds (categories A, B, and C) face particular challenges at the graduate level and beyond in scientific fields (e.g., Inside the Double Bind, A Synthesis of Empirical Research on Undergraduate and Graduate Women of Color in Science Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. http://her.hepg.org/content/t022245n7x4752v2/fulltext.pdf).

D) The disadvantaged background category (C1 and C2) refers to the financial and educational background of individuals, particularly before graduating from high school, while residing in the United States. It should be noted that literature also shows that women from the above backgrounds (categories A, B, and C) face particular challenges at the graduate level and beyond in scientific fields (e.g., Inside the Double Bind, A Synthesis of Empirical Research on Undergraduate and Graduate Women of Color in Science Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. http://her.hepg.org/content/t022245n7x4752v2/fulltext.pdf).

The Grants Facilitation Group at the School of Medicine can assist you with the diversity supplement l applications.

Jeffrey W. Elias, PhD
Director/Manager Grants Facilitation
Office of Research UC Davis School of Medicine
Suite 1424 CTSC
Sacramento, California 95817
(916) 703-9223
https://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/medresearch/grant_facilitation.html
By | 2019-07-26T22:45:06+00:00 January 30, 2019|Diversity, General|